As far as recreational marijuana goes, many bills are on the table in other states, however, it remains illegal for recreational use in: New York, New Jersey, Kentucky, Missouri, Utah, Florida, North Carolina, South Carolina, Idaho, Indiana, Alabama, Wyoming, Maryland, Minnesota, New Mexico, South Dakota, Tennessee, West Virginia, Montana, Connecticut, Rhode Island, North Dakota, Hawaii and New Hampshire.
Cannabidiol, or CBD for short, is a natural phyto-cannabinoid (or plant-based chemical compound) found in cannabis plants, including hemp and marijuana. Unlike other cannabinoids — namely tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC — CBD does not produce any psychoactive effects, and will actually counteract these effects to a degree. CBD will induce feelings of sleepiness; for this reason, it can be an effective soporific for people who struggle to fall and/or remain asleep due to insomnia and other sleep disorders.

As mentioned above, CBD is no longer considered a Schedule I controlled substance under the Farm Act. However, under the DEA’s definition, it remains on the list. This allows for individual states to create exceptions to the status of CBD, even when cultivated from hemp plants grown legally under the act. It also maintains illegal status for any CBD sourced from plants produced in settings that are not consistent with that Act, or by an unlicensed grower. It is expected that more clarification on the status of CBD will come early this year (2019). 
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