All Information Contained On The Site, Services Or Within Any Of The CBD School Social Media Pages Or Channels Are For Informational Purposes Only. Content Posted By CBD School On Any Website, Mobile Application, Social Media Channel, Third-Party Content Services Or Advertisements Are For Informational Purposes Only. CBD School Does Not Offer Medical Advice. Any Information Accessed Through The Site Is Not Intended To Be A Substitute For Medical Advice, Diagnosis, Or Treatment And Not Intended To Cover All Possible Uses, Directions, Precautions, Or Adverse Effects. Please Consult Your Healthcare Professional About Potential Interactions Or Other Possible Complications Before Using Any Product That Is Mentioned On This Site. CBD School Also Reviews Third Party Products Independently And Therefore Some Articles May Contain Affiliate Links. Before Viewing Our Website Please Read Our Term Of Use And Privacy Policy.
Cost is another consideration. Most CBD oils are sold in concentrations of 300 to 750 mg, although this may range from less than 100 mg to more than 2,000. A good indicator of price-point is the cost per milligram. Low-cost CBD oils usually fall between five and 10 cents per mg; mid-range prices are 11 to 15 cents per mg; and higher-end oils cost 16 cents per mg or higher. Given these varying per-milligram costs, a bottle of CBD oil may be priced anywhere from $10 or less to $150 or more.

As mentioned above, CBD is no longer considered a Schedule I controlled substance under the Farm Act. However, under the DEA’s definition, it remains on the list. This allows for individual states to create exceptions to the status of CBD, even when cultivated from hemp plants grown legally under the act. It also maintains illegal status for any CBD sourced from plants produced in settings that are not consistent with that Act, or by an unlicensed grower. It is expected that more clarification on the status of CBD will come early this year (2019).
×